Please don’t overlook your feet! The source and solution to your pain…

Aloha, everyone and Happy Holidays!

Let’s talk about feet! Did you know? They are the source and solution to a lot of your chronic pains, sports injuries, and more.

Our feet are our dynamic base. They simultaneously: 1) provide structural support for the entire body; 2) disperse the forces of gravity from above and below (gravity pulls us down and the ground provides equal force, whether we are standing still or moving); and 3) provide us with mobility.

When we have feet that are well-conditioned to be strong, flexible, and mobile, AND stand as centered as we can in gravity upon those feet, then the structures above take on much less wear and tear (especially those knees. Oh, and the hips. Ah yes, and even the low back. Even the neck? Yes, indeed. Well, we had better add in the shoulders and arms).

Can we work ourselves to a better foundation? Yes, we can. As long as we have Breath, yes we can. We all have different sets of circumstances and different levels of what we will achieve – and with that in mind, we can improve our sense of well-being through our feet. So it’s okay if we aren’t all going to be master acrobats or win the Olympic Marathon. It’s okay even if we are missing a foot (I’ve worked with that too). How can I optimize my well being, starting today? Let’s have a good look at the feet and see where I can start improving…

We are quite often using our feet in less-than-ideal ways, which then creates pain and strain in other places. Wearing shoes, for example, often makes us unable to use them to the fullest. As a prime example, those lovely high heels leave us limping by the end of the evening.

But that’s not all. Most any shoe makes us use our toes less. And I’ve seen so many workout videos on social media, such as plyometrics in athletic shoes. The problem with that is, you’re not able to fully use your feet and lower leg muscles, and therefore coordinate with your hip and upper leg muscles, to do that work. The knees take up a lot of impact.

As for runners and other athletes who need to wear shoes for your chosen sport: I recommend that you take a well-worn pair and look closely at the way that you have been wearing the shoes out. Both of them. This will give you loads of information, as to what is happening, and how you can improve.

Should I wear an insert for my shoe, then? Well…. I have a few precautions about that. If you have “flat feet” and add arch supports; or if you get a customized orthotic insert to keep your foot from rolling in/out, this still hasn’t trained your foot and lower leg muscles to support your structure and coordinated movement, so it won’t necessarily make you less prone to injury or pain. And in the case of those of us who present a leg that seems to be “longer” than the other, a lifted hip (i.e. you are presenting with Scoliosis), putting in one shoe lift to make the hips look more “even” actually causes more problems.

It’s not practical to go without shoes much of the time, so there is an approach. It’s foot re-conditioning. And this also is great for those of us whose athletic endeavors are barefoot, or wearing non-slip socks.

As for bare feet: Recently I started a conversation on Facebook after looking at a social media post from a local fitness studio, touting a truly dysfunctional “pointe foot” as a model to emulate in an adult Barre class that’s offered to non-dancers. Ugh! The dancers in that thread agreed that this wasn’t even a functional pointe foot for dance. The squished toes made me cringe. To see this conversation, goto: https://www.facebook.com/lahela.hekekia/posts/10213272328876227.

What can I say about the pointe foot? It’s something that only serious dancers should consider, under supervised guidance by a really good teacher, and following established protocols. Usually this training happens from a very young age and isn’t likely to develop if we are getting into dance as adults (did you know? Many dancers never use the pointe foot. http://www.danceadvantage.net/pointe-readiness/).

Under no circumstance should an adult Barre class for non-dancers be using this pointe foot – yet I have attended a class taught by someone who was telling everyone to go up to the very tips of the toes. And we were doing a photoshoot for part of the class, so she wanted us up up up on the tips of the toes. I steadfastly refused to do it, knowing that my many-times-sprained right ankle would have a fit over it; that ankle would tell my knee and hip to take on some strain, or tell my body to shift everything to the left – and it would all come crashing down. Thanks, I’ll go onto the ball of my foot where you can actually find stability. Even then, I’ve got a lot of reservations about Barre classes in general, but that’s another story.

As for Pilates: I cringe when I see any Pilates teacher placing one lift under a person’s foot or shortening one strap/rope when using the Reformer… it’s dysfunctional. Period. And there are much better ways of approaching uneven legs/hips. Foot conditioning is part of the process.

Foot re-conditioning is fairly simple. This is something I do with clients, and I’m looking at ways of bringing this to a wider audience. You don’t have to have expensive Pilates equipment, you can use some very inexpensive things that are portable. And foot conditioning will assist you in your chosen sport, especially if it requires running or jumping. Or even just balancing on one leg. Please do comment to my website if you’d like to know more! https://holistictherapiesdirectory.com/united-states/kailua/yoga/lahela-hekekia

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Harley Davidson Quad and Trike from Q-Tec Engineering

Harley Davidson Quad and Trike from Q-Tec Engineering

For many years Sandy Poglavec has had the Harley-Davidson virus in his blood. As a motorcycle aficionado and big fan of Harley-Davidson bikes from the state of Wisconsin, USA, Sandy founded „Poechy’s Classics” in a little town in Belgium called Dilsen-Stokkem. He maintained, repaired, customized and restored many luxury Harley-Davidson motorcycles for the past 20 years.

Sandy’s specialty is designing and building exclusive Harley-Davidson motorcycles for his customers. His partner Erick, on the other hand, is a specialist from the automotive industry. Over the years a remarkable symbiosis among the two developed.

The achievable exclusivity in the motorcycle custom business has potentially reached its limit so both Sandy and Erick believe an expansion in the areas of performance, handling, riding safety and riding experience will be the next dimension in the custom business. With this vision in mind, both have decided to unite their resources and skills at Q-Tec engineering which represents the absolute high end of bike innovation and design.

At Q-Tec their revolutionary concept will create a new dimension for many fans of Harley Davidson motorcycles and potentially even transform their Harley into a trike or even into a quad.

 

By implementing both our frontend and backend units, we can transform your Harley-Davidson motorcycle into the most exclusive and ultimate Quad the world has seen.

The concept is only available from Q-Tec engineering and patented globally. Both the Quad and the Trike variations are street legal and certified to the highest European standards and have been awarded European Type Approval. All variations can be driven with a standard car driving license and do not require a specific motorcycle license.

 

Source: qtec-engineering

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http://viralmega.com/harley-davidson-quad-trike-q-tec-engineering/

On – 06 Dec, 2017 By

Please don’t overlook your feet! The source and solution to your pain…

Aloha, everyone and Happy Holidays!

Let’s talk about feet! Did you know? They are the source and solution to a lot of your chronic pains, sports injuries, and more.

Our feet are our dynamic base. They simultaneously: 1) provide structural support for the entire body; 2) disperse the forces of gravity from above and below (gravity pulls us down and the ground provides equal force, whether we are standing still or moving); and 3) provide us with mobility.

When we have feet that are well-conditioned to be strong, flexible, and mobile, AND stand as centered as we can in gravity upon those feet, then the structures above take on much less wear and tear (especially those knees. Oh, and the hips. Ah yes, and even the low back. Even the neck? Yes, indeed. Well, we had better add in the shoulders and arms).

Can we work ourselves to a better foundation? Yes, we can. As long as we have Breath, yes we can. We all have different sets of circumstances and different levels of what we will achieve – and with that in mind, we can improve our sense of well-being through our feet. So it’s okay if we aren’t all going to be master acrobats or win the Olympic Marathon. It’s okay even if we are missing a foot (I’ve worked with that too). How can I optimize my well being, starting today? Let’s have a good look at the feet and see where I can start improving…

We are quite often using our feet in less-than-ideal ways, which then creates pain and strain in other places. Wearing shoes, for example, often makes us unable to use them to the fullest. As a prime example, those lovely high heels leave us limping by the end of the evening.

But that’s not all. Most any shoe makes us use our toes less. And I’ve seen so many workout videos on social media, such as plyometrics in athletic shoes. The problem with that is, you’re not able to fully use your feet and lower leg muscles, and therefore coordinate with your hip and upper leg muscles, to do that work. The knees take up a lot of impact.

As for runners and other athletes who need to wear shoes for your chosen sport: I recommend that you take a well-worn pair and look closely at the way that you have been wearing the shoes out. Both of them. This will give you loads of information, as to what is happening, and how you can improve.

Should I wear an insert for my shoe, then? Well…. I have a few precautions about that. If you have “flat feet” and add arch supports; or if you get a customized orthotic insert to keep your foot from rolling in/out, this still hasn’t trained your foot and lower leg muscles to support your structure and coordinated movement, so it won’t necessarily make you less prone to injury or pain. And in the case of those of us who present a leg that seems to be “longer” than the other, a lifted hip (i.e. you are presenting with Scoliosis), putting in one shoe lift to make the hips look more “even” actually causes more problems.

It’s not practical to go without shoes much of the time, so there is an approach. It’s foot re-conditioning. And this also is great for those of us whose athletic endeavors are barefoot, or wearing non-slip socks.

As for bare feet: Recently I started a conversation on Facebook after looking at a social media post from a local fitness studio, touting a truly dysfunctional “pointe foot” as a model to emulate in an adult Barre class that’s offered to non-dancers. Ugh! The dancers in that thread agreed that this wasn’t even a functional pointe foot for dance. The squished toes made me cringe. To see this conversation, goto: https://www.facebook.com/lahela.hekekia/posts/10213272328876227.

What can I say about the pointe foot? It’s something that only serious dancers should consider, under supervised guidance by a really good teacher, and following established protocols. Usually this training happens from a very young age and isn’t likely to develop if we are getting into dance as adults (did you know? Many dancers never use the pointe foot. http://www.danceadvantage.net/pointe-readiness/).

Under no circumstance should an adult Barre class for non-dancers be using this pointe foot – yet I have attended a class taught by someone who was telling everyone to go up to the very tips of the toes. And we were doing a photoshoot for part of the class, so she wanted us up up up on the tips of the toes. I steadfastly refused to do it, knowing that my many-times-sprained right ankle would have a fit over it; that ankle would tell my knee and hip to take on some strain, or tell my body to shift everything to the left – and it would all come crashing down. Thanks, I’ll go onto the ball of my foot where you can actually find stability. Even then, I’ve got a lot of reservations about Barre classes in general, but that’s another story.

As for Pilates: I cringe when I see any Pilates teacher placing one lift under a person’s foot or shortening one strap/rope when using the Reformer… it’s dysfunctional. Period. And there are much better ways of approaching uneven legs/hips. Foot conditioning is part of the process.

Foot re-conditioning is fairly simple. This is something I do with clients, and I’m looking at ways of bringing this to a wider audience. You don’t have to have expensive Pilates equipment, you can use some very inexpensive things that are portable. And foot conditioning will assist you in your chosen sport, especially if it requires running or jumping. Or even just balancing on one leg. Please do comment to my website if you’d like to know more! https://holistictherapiesdirectory.com/united-states/kailua/yoga/lahela-hekekia

Blood Count Healing Testimonial

Blood Count Healing Testimonial    My name is Gareth, My wife Shirley and daughter Emma, contacted Joanne Brocas for a distance spiritual healing treatment on behalf of myself. I was taken into hospital by ambulance because of severe stomach pain. On investigation from blood tests and scans, it revealed that I had pancreatitis and stones […]

First Ever HIV+ Restaurant Is Ready To Open For Business | Squawker

First Ever HIV+ Restaurant Is Ready To Open For Business | Squawker

Casey House, (the first and only stand-alone hospital for people with AIDS/HIV) Tweeted an invitation to anyone willing to put their lives on the line. Perhaps that’s a bit dramatic, but surly I’m not alone in feeling discomforted. Their Tweet reads:

Join Matt Basile and his team of HIV positive cooks at the first- ever HIV positive eatery! 

Of course, following the tweet was the hashtag #SmashStigma. It costs $125 to eat at this restaurant who only employs those who are HIV positive. So here’s your choice: either A) pay your electric bill, or B) feel really uncomfortable in Canada in the name of “social justice.” Hmmm, such difficult decisions…

On a more serious note, the “stigma” is there for a reason. Until recently, you couldn’t just knowingly spread this life threatening disease without consequencesNow, it’s like a badge of honor, something to flaunt and carry with pride. Christian Hui Tweeted this:

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Why is he honored to have an incurable disease? What about that makes him proud? Does he get +5 oppression points, or something? Here is a link to the site. View it at your own risk. 

Do you support this event? Why or why not? Let me know in the comments, on Facebook, or on Twitter.

https://squawker.org/culture-wars/first-ever-hiv-restaurant-is-ready-to-smashstigma/

On – 28 Oct, 2017 By Alisha Sherron

Can Pilates Help with Carpal Tunnel Symptoms? It’s More Than just the Wrist!

Ah, “Carpal Tunnel.” You likely know a fair number of people who say that they have the symptoms (tingling and/or numbness) or even had the surgery.

I often teach modified Pilates to people with injuries and spinal conditions (like Scoliosis, for example), but I’m excited to also be working with a client/friend who recently wrote to me and asked:

“Can Pilates help with my Carpal Tunnel?”

and,

“Can I do anything else besides surgery?”

I gave her the short answer: Well not from a group class in “regular” Pilates

but yes, it’s possible to improve if your Pilates Teacher also happens to be a Massage Therapist or Physical Therapist. The teacher needs to have an advanced knowledge of Anatomy and Kinesiology. Classical Pilates training tends not to teach any of that and just go over standardized exercises. Some of the modern Pilates methods focus on Anatomy/Kinesiology, and the ones who do tend to attract P.T.s and others in the healing arts. And a growing number of Pilates teachers seek out additional knowledge once certified. But when it comes to something specialized like Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, your best bet is to find someone who is also in a therapeutic field such as Massage Therapy or Physical Therapy.\

That was enough for my friend to book an appointment and see what this was all about.

The Medical viewpoint on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is fairly straight-forward. Let’s take a look at a well-respected source, the Mayo Clinic: Physicians say that Carpal Tunnel Syndrome involves a compressed nerve in your wrist. Tell-tale symptoms (such as tingling and numbness in the fingers) are often noticed when gripping (for example, holding your phone), and doing repetitive movements of the fingers/hands/wrists such as typing. To diagnose this condition, Doctors test your muscle strength and sense of feeling in the fingers. They might also order some diagnostic tests such as an Electromyogram, to assess your muscles and nerves. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/carpal-tunnel-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20355603; https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/emg/basics/definition/prc-20014183

It’s important to note that you should not diagnose yourself – nor should your Pilates teacher or Massage therapist. Only your Physician can do this.

Conventional Medical treatments for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome are somewhat limited. You’ll likely be advised to avoid activities that aggravate your symptoms. And generally, you’d be considering splints, cortisone shots, medications, and surgery – which generally involves severing a ligament in the wrist. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/carpal-tunnel-syndrome/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20355608

Whether you elect surgery, that is between you and your Physician. Before doing so, I recommend that you do your own research on what to expect after surgery, including the time it may take to recover – and it’s a great idea to get feedback from friends and colleagues who have had the procedure. Also, it’s important for you to define what it means to have a successful result.

Now we have reached that proverbial million dollar question: Does Carpal Tunnel Surgery “Work?” It depends on whom you’re asking – the Surgeon? Or the Patient? Results vary, and long-term results speak volumes. So again, the more information you have, the more you can manage your expectations.

I don’t mean to scare you, but…

Apparently, symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Sydrome eventually return to 85% of people who have had the surgery – and many people have repeat surgeries despite Physicians claiming high success rates. https://www.mycarpaltunnel.com/carpal-tunnel-surgery-success-rate.shtml

Apparently Physicians consider the surgery successful if there is “ANY improvement” after surgery (at least according to that linked article above). Does that mean a 25% improvement? This I don’t know – it’s certainly something to ask your Surgeon.

The Medical community knows that their claimed success rate of 75-90% needs to be more thoroughly evaluated, especially for long-term success rates. The American Association of Hand Surgery publishes an intriguing report stating that, “Resolution of symptoms and recovery of function after CTR have not been as thoroughly addressed in the long-term as they have in the short-term.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3418353/

What is a successful result to the Patient? Most of us want our pain gone or significantly improved, right? We’d like to not have to wear that splint or worry about finding a new career, or giving up our favorite sport. The fact is, that nobody can guarantee a result.

So, I’m not telling you NOT to have that surgery – you might be pleased with the result. It’s possible to work with you even after having the surgery. You’ll just have to make sure that your Physician clears the activity and provides any restrictions or special directions.

The next million dollar question is: What are alternatives to surgery; and can I do these things after surgery? I’ve listed a few options to explore:

1. Specialized, advanced massage techniques. I attended an amazing training in Haase Myotherapy which has a protocol for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, among others. Indeed – Robert Haase said in our training that so many of his clients CANCELED their carpal tunnel surgeries after working with him, that a local Surgeon came to visit. I can offer this therapy to my clients, as a Licensed Massage Therapist (MAT#6286) who is also Board Certified by NCBTMB (307766-00). https://www.haasemyotherapy.com/

2. Laser Therapy: I use the laser for different reasons, with my awesome Chiropractor, Dr. Paul Thurlow. Recently, I asked if his Laser would help with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – even for someone who has had an unsuccessful surgery. Dr. Thurlow told me that it’s possible to get a 70% improvement in symptoms according to research. At any rate, you can also see in his website some statistics with the laser therapy. http://lasertherapyhawaii.com/

3. Therapeutic Movement and Breathing. This is where I integrate a highly modified type of Pilates exercise with Osteopathic Sciences and gentle hands-on therapy that my massage license allows. www.lahelafit.com.

While the Physician is focused on the hands and wrist, I like to point out things that he/she is not noticing:

1. Your Posture and how it affects tension in the neck and shoulder. How people sit, stand and move – that’s an integral part of my practice. Can you reach the top shelf easily? Do you slouch at your desk all day? Do you shrug your shoulders while tapping away at your laptop or moving your mouse? Or – egads – try to hold your phone between your ear and shoulder while trying to work with your hands? Do you sleep on your belly?

Why would any of that matter for the wrist? Well, it does. I show you why. I look for things that can be improved and show you how that is possible, with repetition and time.

2. Full, healthy, and functional BREATHING makes a world of difference and can help you improve your posture, flexibility, mobility, and affects you from head to toe and from hand to foot. I can quickly show you how different it feels to breathe fully, compared to the shallow and tension-filled breathing that many of us unknowingly have (I sure had it for years before discovering Osteopathic Sciences).

Quick rant about “regular” Pilates: This discipline often teaches improper breathing. If you’re a Pilates fanatic already, you likely have heard your teacher exhorting you to “suck in the belly, belly button to spine;” “feel as if you’re in between two panes of glass,” and maybe “exhale through pursed lips.” I’m sorry to disappoint you, but it’s quite dysfunctional. Not all Pilates methods do this type of breathing, but many thousands of teachers were trained this way, especially if we trained at least 10 years ago.

Perhaps you’ve seen a little teaser article about Breathing in an earlier publication? I guarantee that I’ll be writing more about Breathing in my website. Stay tuned!

I also teach people a bit of anatomy, especially their nerves, in a way that’s easy to digest. You know – I’m not sure why Doctors wouldn’t realize why the collar bone is such an important thing to notice, and how it applies to breathing, posture, and pain (or relief from pain). Are you curious? Good – stay tuned for more on that, as well.

More than anything – A proper Pilates session focuses on improving your every day posture and habits – especially your Breathing. Imagine how often you breathe – on average 22,000 times per day. Imagine how many times you use your hands, in conjunction with your arm and shoulder. I can’t even begin to count. Now imagine if we can improve bit by bit, those things that we do often, every day. Add it up. Then you can get a picture of how you get started in relieving your aches and pains. For me as a Pilates teacher, a successful result is if you walk away feeling taller, more flexible, and with less pain (perhaps none at all).

It’s been my adamant position, ever since massage school almost 20 years ago, that Carpal Tunnel involves a lot more than just the wrist. I look forward to writing more and staying in touch with you all. Please do visit my website and shoot me an email!

Aloha,

Lahela

Can Pilates Help with Carpal Tunnel Symptoms? It’s More Than just the Wrist!

Ah, “Carpal Tunnel.” You likely know a fair number of people who say that they have the symptoms (tingling and/or numbness) or even had the surgery.

I often teach modified Pilates to people with injuries and spinal conditions (like Scoliosis, for example), but I’m excited to also be working with a client/friend who recently wrote to me and asked:

“Can Pilates help with my Carpal Tunnel?”

and,

“Can I do anything else besides surgery?”

I gave her the short answer: Well not from a group class in “regular” Pilates

but yes, it’s possible to improve if your Pilates Teacher also happens to be a Massage Therapist or Physical Therapist. The teacher needs to have an advanced knowledge of Anatomy and Kinesiology. Classical Pilates training tends not to teach any of that and just go over standardized exercises. Some of the modern Pilates methods focus on Anatomy/Kinesiology, and the ones who do tend to attract P.T.s and others in the healing arts. And a growing number of Pilates teachers seek out additional knowledge once certified. But when it comes to something specialized like Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, your best bet is to find someone who is also in a therapeutic field such as Massage Therapy or Physical Therapy.\

That was enough for my friend to book an appointment and see what this was all about.

The Medical viewpoint on Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is fairly straight-forward. Let’s take a look at a well-respected source, the Mayo Clinic: Physicians say that Carpal Tunnel Syndrome involves a compressed nerve in your wrist. Tell-tale symptoms (such as tingling and numbness in the fingers) are often noticed when gripping (for example, holding your phone), and doing repetitive movements of the fingers/hands/wrists such as typing. To diagnose this condition, Doctors test your muscle strength and sense of feeling in the fingers. They might also order some diagnostic tests such as an Electromyogram, to assess your muscles and nerves. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/carpal-tunnel-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20355603; https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/emg/basics/definition/prc-20014183

It’s important to note that you should not diagnose yourself – nor should your Pilates teacher or Massage therapist. Only your Physician can do this.

Conventional Medical treatments for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome are somewhat limited. You’ll likely be advised to avoid activities that aggravate your symptoms. And generally, you’d be considering splints, cortisone shots, medications, and surgery – which generally involves severing a ligament in the wrist. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/carpal-tunnel-syndrome/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20355608

Whether you elect surgery, that is between you and your Physician. Before doing so, I recommend that you do your own research on what to expect after surgery, including the time it may take to recover – and it’s a great idea to get feedback from friends and colleagues who have had the procedure. Also, it’s important for you to define what it means to have a successful result.

Now we have reached that proverbial million dollar question: Does Carpal Tunnel Surgery “Work?” It depends on whom you’re asking – the Surgeon? Or the Patient? Results vary, and long-term results speak volumes. So again, the more information you have, the more you can manage your expectations.

I don’t mean to scare you, but…

Apparently, symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Sydrome eventually return to 85% of people who have had the surgery – and many people have repeat surgeries despite Physicians claiming high success rates. https://www.mycarpaltunnel.com/carpal-tunnel-surgery-success-rate.shtml

Apparently Physicians consider the surgery successful if there is “ANY improvement” after surgery (at least according to that linked article above). Does that mean a 25% improvement? This I don’t know – it’s certainly something to ask your Surgeon.

The Medical community knows that their claimed success rate of 75-90% needs to be more thoroughly evaluated, especially for long-term success rates. The American Association of Hand Surgery publishes an intriguing report stating that, “Resolution of symptoms and recovery of function after CTR have not been as thoroughly addressed in the long-term as they have in the short-term.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3418353/

What is a successful result to the Patient? Most of us want our pain gone or significantly improved, right? We’d like to not have to wear that splint or worry about finding a new career, or giving up our favorite sport. The fact is, that nobody can guarantee a result.

So, I’m not telling you NOT to have that surgery – you might be pleased with the result. It’s possible to work with you even after having the surgery. You’ll just have to make sure that your Physician clears the activity and provides any restrictions or special directions.

The next million dollar question is: What are alternatives to surgery; and can I do these things after surgery? I’ve listed a few options to explore:

1. Specialized, advanced massage techniques. I attended an amazing training in Haase Myotherapy which has a protocol for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, among others. Indeed – Robert Haase said in our training that so many of his clients CANCELED their carpal tunnel surgeries after working with him, that a local Surgeon came to visit. I can offer this therapy to my clients, as a Licensed Massage Therapist (MAT#6286) who is also Board Certified by NCBTMB (307766-00). https://www.haasemyotherapy.com/

2. Laser Therapy: I use the laser for different reasons, with my awesome Chiropractor, Dr. Paul Thurlow. Recently, I asked if his Laser would help with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome – even for someone who has had an unsuccessful surgery. Dr. Thurlow told me that it’s possible to get a 70% improvement in symptoms according to research. At any rate, you can also see in his website some statistics with the laser therapy. http://lasertherapyhawaii.com/

3. Therapeutic Movement and Breathing. This is where I integrate a highly modified type of Pilates exercise with Osteopathic Sciences and gentle hands-on therapy that my massage license allows. www.lahelafit.com.

While the Physician is focused on the hands and wrist, I like to point out things that he/she is not noticing:

1. Your Posture and how it affects tension in the neck and shoulder. How people sit, stand and move – that’s an integral part of my practice. Can you reach the top shelf easily? Do you slouch at your desk all day? Do you shrug your shoulders while tapping away at your laptop or moving your mouse? Or – egads – try to hold your phone between your ear and shoulder while trying to work with your hands? Do you sleep on your belly?

Why would any of that matter for the wrist? Well, it does. I show you why. I look for things that can be improved and show you how that is possible, with repetition and time.

2. Full, healthy, and functional BREATHING makes a world of difference and can help you improve your posture, flexibility, mobility, and affects you from head to toe and from hand to foot. I can quickly show you how different it feels to breathe fully, compared to the shallow and tension-filled breathing that many of us unknowingly have (I sure had it for years before discovering Osteopathic Sciences).

Quick rant about “regular” Pilates: This discipline often teaches improper breathing. If you’re a Pilates fanatic already, you likely have heard your teacher exhorting you to “suck in the belly, belly button to spine;” “feel as if you’re in between two panes of glass,” and maybe “exhale through pursed lips.” I’m sorry to disappoint you, but it’s quite dysfunctional. Not all Pilates methods do this type of breathing, but many thousands of teachers were trained this way, especially if we trained at least 10 years ago.

Perhaps you’ve seen a little teaser article about Breathing in an earlier publication? I guarantee that I’ll be writing more about Breathing in my website. Stay tuned!

I also teach people a bit of anatomy, especially their nerves, in a way that’s easy to digest. You know – I’m not sure why Doctors wouldn’t realize why the collar bone is such an important thing to notice, and how it applies to breathing, posture, and pain (or relief from pain). Are you curious? Good – stay tuned for more on that, as well.

More than anything – A proper Pilates session focuses on improving your every day posture and habits – especially your Breathing. Imagine how often you breathe – on average 22,000 times per day. Imagine how many times you use your hands, in conjunction with your arm and shoulder. I can’t even begin to count. Now imagine if we can improve bit by bit, those things that we do often, every day. Add it up. Then you can get a picture of how you get started in relieving your aches and pains. For me as a Pilates teacher, a successful result is if you walk away feeling taller, more flexible, and with less pain (perhaps none at all).

It’s been my adamant position, ever since massage school almost 20 years ago, that Carpal Tunnel involves a lot more than just the wrist. I look forward to writing more and staying in touch with you all. Please do visit my website and shoot me an email!

Aloha,

Lahela