Innovations Shaping the Organic Personal Care Products

 

Why do more and more people prefer and opt for organic personal care products these days? Are such products really of a big deal? Well, organic personal care products are just as important as the organic food we consume. They contain natural and organic ingredients sourced from plants and minerals. In other words, these products are prepared without the use of chemicals or synthetics. In addition, organic and personal care products are eco-friendly and healthier.

The market for organic personal care products is growing with consumers perceiving them as better and safer than regular products. They are luring more consumers, inspiring young brands and attracting several companies in the space. The organic personal care products market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 10.2% during the forecast period, 2018-2025. Growing concerns related to health and beauty among consumers mainly drives the industry. Besides, the rise in the standard of living and the growing disposable income of people in the developing countries are propelling the market growth. On the other hand, the short shelf life of organic personal care products and better results obtained from advanced beauty treatments cause hindrances to the market growth.

Active players in the industry are working to meet the growing demand for natural skin products, toothpaste, soaps, shampoos, makeup, and so on. They are expanding their presence worldwide by means of certain marketing strategies such as innovative product launches. For instance, Rosemira Organics recently launched an organic skincare sample kit with a free voucher to help people experience their products and learn how they can meet their health and beauty requirements. ECOCERT introduced its revolutionary beauty brand called Divine Organics that fuses nature with beauty. L’Oréal recently announced the launch of its new vegan plant-based hair dye collection called Botanea. Rael, a startup recently launched an organic menstrual pad trial kit which is chlorine free, fragrance-free, toxin-free, and made of 100% breathable organic cotton.

Rosemira Organics Introduces Organic Skin Care Products

In December 2017, Rosemira Organics, one of the biggest online organic health and beauty retailers announced its launch of an organic sample kit so that consumers can experience the quality of their wonderful products. The sample pack is being offered with three products which include a cleanser, a hydrosol toner, and a treatment serum. For every kit ordered, the company provides an extra free sample of a moisturizing cream. The organic skincare sample pack comes with free shipping and at an initial price of ten dollars. However, the company offers a ten-dollar voucher which makes the pack free of cost. The voucher is valid for the customers first purchase only.

A Revolutionary Beauty Brand by ECOCERT

ECOCERT, the largest organic certification organization in the world launched an organic beauty brand in December 2017. Called Divine Organics, the brand becomes India’s first comprehensive range of beauty brand to foster a healthy lifestyle. Divine Organics makes sure that its products are 100% organic, free of harmful chemicals, and use organic manufacturing methods. Hence, the brand ensures that no additives are used in the products or in the production process so that customer can enjoy greater transparency in their products.

L’Oréal Launches New Hair Dye Collection

L’Oréal SA, a French cosmetics company announced the release of its first vegan, 100 percent plant-based hair dye collection called Botanea. The new product line is sourced from three plants of Indian origin and will be available in European salons in 2018. The launch is a reaction to the fast-growing natural and organic personal care products market. The company is also hoping to strengthen their professional products sector, which has been the slowest-performing area in the recent times.

“We’ve managed to marry naturalness with a professional result without compromising on either point,” said Marion Brunet, head of the L’Oréal Professional brand at a launch event in Paris.

Startup Unveils an Organic Menstrual Pad Trial Kit

Rael, a startup company launched an organic menstrual pad trial kit in December 2017. The kit provides women the convenience of trying safe, organic sanitary pads for their monthly needs. The release was a response to the growing awareness of toxic chemicals found in sanitary pads. The product is free of chlorine, fragrance, and toxins and made up of 100% breathable organic cotton. The kit comes with full-size packages of regular pads, regular pantyliners, feminine wash and one single facial sheet mask. Compared to the organic sanitary pads available in the market, the quality of Rael pads is high and the cost is low.

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Please don’t overlook your feet! The source and solution to your pain…

Aloha, everyone and Happy Holidays!

Let’s talk about feet! Did you know? They are the source and solution to a lot of your chronic pains, sports injuries, and more.

Our feet are our dynamic base. They simultaneously: 1) provide structural support for the entire body; 2) disperse the forces of gravity from above and below (gravity pulls us down and the ground provides equal force, whether we are standing still or moving); and 3) provide us with mobility.

When we have feet that are well-conditioned to be strong, flexible, and mobile, AND stand as centered as we can in gravity upon those feet, then the structures above take on much less wear and tear (especially those knees. Oh, and the hips. Ah yes, and even the low back. Even the neck? Yes, indeed. Well, we had better add in the shoulders and arms).

Can we work ourselves to a better foundation? Yes, we can. As long as we have Breath, yes we can. We all have different sets of circumstances and different levels of what we will achieve – and with that in mind, we can improve our sense of well-being through our feet. So it’s okay if we aren’t all going to be master acrobats or win the Olympic Marathon. It’s okay even if we are missing a foot (I’ve worked with that too). How can I optimize my well being, starting today? Let’s have a good look at the feet and see where I can start improving…

We are quite often using our feet in less-than-ideal ways, which then creates pain and strain in other places. Wearing shoes, for example, often makes us unable to use them to the fullest. As a prime example, those lovely high heels leave us limping by the end of the evening.

But that’s not all. Most any shoe makes us use our toes less. And I’ve seen so many workout videos on social media, such as plyometrics in athletic shoes. The problem with that is, you’re not able to fully use your feet and lower leg muscles, and therefore coordinate with your hip and upper leg muscles, to do that work. The knees take up a lot of impact.

As for runners and other athletes who need to wear shoes for your chosen sport: I recommend that you take a well-worn pair and look closely at the way that you have been wearing the shoes out. Both of them. This will give you loads of information, as to what is happening, and how you can improve.

Should I wear an insert for my shoe, then? Well…. I have a few precautions about that. If you have “flat feet” and add arch supports; or if you get a customized orthotic insert to keep your foot from rolling in/out, this still hasn’t trained your foot and lower leg muscles to support your structure and coordinated movement, so it won’t necessarily make you less prone to injury or pain. And in the case of those of us who present a leg that seems to be “longer” than the other, a lifted hip (i.e. you are presenting with Scoliosis), putting in one shoe lift to make the hips look more “even” actually causes more problems.

It’s not practical to go without shoes much of the time, so there is an approach. It’s foot re-conditioning. And this also is great for those of us whose athletic endeavors are barefoot, or wearing non-slip socks.

As for bare feet: Recently I started a conversation on Facebook after looking at a social media post from a local fitness studio, touting a truly dysfunctional “pointe foot” as a model to emulate in an adult Barre class that’s offered to non-dancers. Ugh! The dancers in that thread agreed that this wasn’t even a functional pointe foot for dance. The squished toes made me cringe. To see this conversation, goto: https://www.facebook.com/lahela.hekekia/posts/10213272328876227.

What can I say about the pointe foot? It’s something that only serious dancers should consider, under supervised guidance by a really good teacher, and following established protocols. Usually this training happens from a very young age and isn’t likely to develop if we are getting into dance as adults (did you know? Many dancers never use the pointe foot. http://www.danceadvantage.net/pointe-readiness/).

Under no circumstance should an adult Barre class for non-dancers be using this pointe foot – yet I have attended a class taught by someone who was telling everyone to go up to the very tips of the toes. And we were doing a photoshoot for part of the class, so she wanted us up up up on the tips of the toes. I steadfastly refused to do it, knowing that my many-times-sprained right ankle would have a fit over it; that ankle would tell my knee and hip to take on some strain, or tell my body to shift everything to the left – and it would all come crashing down. Thanks, I’ll go onto the ball of my foot where you can actually find stability. Even then, I’ve got a lot of reservations about Barre classes in general, but that’s another story.

As for Pilates: I cringe when I see any Pilates teacher placing one lift under a person’s foot or shortening one strap/rope when using the Reformer… it’s dysfunctional. Period. And there are much better ways of approaching uneven legs/hips. Foot conditioning is part of the process.

Foot re-conditioning is fairly simple. This is something I do with clients, and I’m looking at ways of bringing this to a wider audience. You don’t have to have expensive Pilates equipment, you can use some very inexpensive things that are portable. And foot conditioning will assist you in your chosen sport, especially if it requires running or jumping. Or even just balancing on one leg. Please do comment to my website if you’d like to know more! https://holistictherapiesdirectory.com/united-states/kailua/yoga/lahela-hekekia

Please don’t overlook your feet! The source and solution to your pain…

Aloha, everyone and Happy Holidays!

Let’s talk about feet! Did you know? They are the source and solution to a lot of your chronic pains, sports injuries, and more.

Our feet are our dynamic base. They simultaneously: 1) provide structural support for the entire body; 2) disperse the forces of gravity from above and below (gravity pulls us down and the ground provides equal force, whether we are standing still or moving); and 3) provide us with mobility.

When we have feet that are well-conditioned to be strong, flexible, and mobile, AND stand as centered as we can in gravity upon those feet, then the structures above take on much less wear and tear (especially those knees. Oh, and the hips. Ah yes, and even the low back. Even the neck? Yes, indeed. Well, we had better add in the shoulders and arms).

Can we work ourselves to a better foundation? Yes, we can. As long as we have Breath, yes we can. We all have different sets of circumstances and different levels of what we will achieve – and with that in mind, we can improve our sense of well-being through our feet. So it’s okay if we aren’t all going to be master acrobats or win the Olympic Marathon. It’s okay even if we are missing a foot (I’ve worked with that too). How can I optimize my well being, starting today? Let’s have a good look at the feet and see where I can start improving…

We are quite often using our feet in less-than-ideal ways, which then creates pain and strain in other places. Wearing shoes, for example, often makes us unable to use them to the fullest. As a prime example, those lovely high heels leave us limping by the end of the evening.

But that’s not all. Most any shoe makes us use our toes less. And I’ve seen so many workout videos on social media, such as plyometrics in athletic shoes. The problem with that is, you’re not able to fully use your feet and lower leg muscles, and therefore coordinate with your hip and upper leg muscles, to do that work. The knees take up a lot of impact.

As for runners and other athletes who need to wear shoes for your chosen sport: I recommend that you take a well-worn pair and look closely at the way that you have been wearing the shoes out. Both of them. This will give you loads of information, as to what is happening, and how you can improve.

Should I wear an insert for my shoe, then? Well…. I have a few precautions about that. If you have “flat feet” and add arch supports; or if you get a customized orthotic insert to keep your foot from rolling in/out, this still hasn’t trained your foot and lower leg muscles to support your structure and coordinated movement, so it won’t necessarily make you less prone to injury or pain. And in the case of those of us who present a leg that seems to be “longer” than the other, a lifted hip (i.e. you are presenting with Scoliosis), putting in one shoe lift to make the hips look more “even” actually causes more problems.

It’s not practical to go without shoes much of the time, so there is an approach. It’s foot re-conditioning. And this also is great for those of us whose athletic endeavors are barefoot, or wearing non-slip socks.

As for bare feet: Recently I started a conversation on Facebook after looking at a social media post from a local fitness studio, touting a truly dysfunctional “pointe foot” as a model to emulate in an adult Barre class that’s offered to non-dancers. Ugh! The dancers in that thread agreed that this wasn’t even a functional pointe foot for dance. The squished toes made me cringe. To see this conversation, goto: https://www.facebook.com/lahela.hekekia/posts/10213272328876227.

What can I say about the pointe foot? It’s something that only serious dancers should consider, under supervised guidance by a really good teacher, and following established protocols. Usually this training happens from a very young age and isn’t likely to develop if we are getting into dance as adults (did you know? Many dancers never use the pointe foot. http://www.danceadvantage.net/pointe-readiness/).

Under no circumstance should an adult Barre class for non-dancers be using this pointe foot – yet I have attended a class taught by someone who was telling everyone to go up to the very tips of the toes. And we were doing a photoshoot for part of the class, so she wanted us up up up on the tips of the toes. I steadfastly refused to do it, knowing that my many-times-sprained right ankle would have a fit over it; that ankle would tell my knee and hip to take on some strain, or tell my body to shift everything to the left – and it would all come crashing down. Thanks, I’ll go onto the ball of my foot where you can actually find stability. Even then, I’ve got a lot of reservations about Barre classes in general, but that’s another story.

As for Pilates: I cringe when I see any Pilates teacher placing one lift under a person’s foot or shortening one strap/rope when using the Reformer… it’s dysfunctional. Period. And there are much better ways of approaching uneven legs/hips. Foot conditioning is part of the process.

Foot re-conditioning is fairly simple. This is something I do with clients, and I’m looking at ways of bringing this to a wider audience. You don’t have to have expensive Pilates equipment, you can use some very inexpensive things that are portable. And foot conditioning will assist you in your chosen sport, especially if it requires running or jumping. Or even just balancing on one leg. Please do comment to my website if you’d like to know more! https://holistictherapiesdirectory.com/united-states/kailua/yoga/lahela-hekekia

Please don’t overlook your feet! The source and solution to your pain…

Aloha, everyone and Happy Holidays!

Let’s talk about feet! Did you know? They are the source and solution to a lot of your chronic pains, sports injuries, and more.

Our feet are our dynamic base. They simultaneously: 1) provide structural support for the entire body; 2) disperse the forces of gravity from above and below (gravity pulls us down and the ground provides equal force, whether we are standing still or moving); and 3) provide us with mobility.

When we have feet that are well-conditioned to be strong, flexible, and mobile, AND stand as centered as we can in gravity upon those feet, then the structures above take on much less wear and tear (especially those knees. Oh, and the hips. Ah yes, and even the low back. Even the neck? Yes, indeed. Well, we had better add in the shoulders and arms).

Can we work ourselves to a better foundation? Yes, we can. As long as we have Breath, yes we can. We all have different sets of circumstances and different levels of what we will achieve – and with that in mind, we can improve our sense of well-being through our feet. So it’s okay if we aren’t all going to be master acrobats or win the Olympic Marathon. It’s okay even if we are missing a foot (I’ve worked with that too). How can I optimize my well being, starting today? Let’s have a good look at the feet and see where I can start improving…

We are quite often using our feet in less-than-ideal ways, which then creates pain and strain in other places. Wearing shoes, for example, often makes us unable to use them to the fullest. As a prime example, those lovely high heels leave us limping by the end of the evening.

But that’s not all. Most any shoe makes us use our toes less. And I’ve seen so many workout videos on social media, such as plyometrics in athletic shoes. The problem with that is, you’re not able to fully use your feet and lower leg muscles, and therefore coordinate with your hip and upper leg muscles, to do that work. The knees take up a lot of impact.

As for runners and other athletes who need to wear shoes for your chosen sport: I recommend that you take a well-worn pair and look closely at the way that you have been wearing the shoes out. Both of them. This will give you loads of information, as to what is happening, and how you can improve.

Should I wear an insert for my shoe, then? Well…. I have a few precautions about that. If you have “flat feet” and add arch supports; or if you get a customized orthotic insert to keep your foot from rolling in/out, this still hasn’t trained your foot and lower leg muscles to support your structure and coordinated movement, so it won’t necessarily make you less prone to injury or pain. And in the case of those of us who present a leg that seems to be “longer” than the other, a lifted hip (i.e. you are presenting with Scoliosis), putting in one shoe lift to make the hips look more “even” actually causes more problems.

It’s not practical to go without shoes much of the time, so there is an approach. It’s foot re-conditioning. And this also is great for those of us whose athletic endeavors are barefoot, or wearing non-slip socks.

As for bare feet: Recently I started a conversation on Facebook after looking at a social media post from a local fitness studio, touting a truly dysfunctional “pointe foot” as a model to emulate in an adult Barre class that’s offered to non-dancers. Ugh! The dancers in that thread agreed that this wasn’t even a functional pointe foot for dance. The squished toes made me cringe. To see this conversation, goto: https://www.facebook.com/lahela.hekekia/posts/10213272328876227.

What can I say about the pointe foot? It’s something that only serious dancers should consider, under supervised guidance by a really good teacher, and following established protocols. Usually this training happens from a very young age and isn’t likely to develop if we are getting into dance as adults (did you know? Many dancers never use the pointe foot. http://www.danceadvantage.net/pointe-readiness/).

Under no circumstance should an adult Barre class for non-dancers be using this pointe foot – yet I have attended a class taught by someone who was telling everyone to go up to the very tips of the toes. And we were doing a photoshoot for part of the class, so she wanted us up up up on the tips of the toes. I steadfastly refused to do it, knowing that my many-times-sprained right ankle would have a fit over it; that ankle would tell my knee and hip to take on some strain, or tell my body to shift everything to the left – and it would all come crashing down. Thanks, I’ll go onto the ball of my foot where you can actually find stability. Even then, I’ve got a lot of reservations about Barre classes in general, but that’s another story.

As for Pilates: I cringe when I see any Pilates teacher placing one lift under a person’s foot or shortening one strap/rope when using the Reformer… it’s dysfunctional. Period. And there are much better ways of approaching uneven legs/hips. Foot conditioning is part of the process.

Foot re-conditioning is fairly simple. This is something I do with clients, and I’m looking at ways of bringing this to a wider audience. You don’t have to have expensive Pilates equipment, you can use some very inexpensive things that are portable. And foot conditioning will assist you in your chosen sport, especially if it requires running or jumping. Or even just balancing on one leg. Please do comment to my website if you’d like to know more! https://holistictherapiesdirectory.com/united-states/kailua/yoga/lahela-hekekia

Harley Davidson Quad and Trike from Q-Tec Engineering

Harley Davidson Quad and Trike from Q-Tec Engineering

For many years Sandy Poglavec has had the Harley-Davidson virus in his blood. As a motorcycle aficionado and big fan of Harley-Davidson bikes from the state of Wisconsin, USA, Sandy founded „Poechy’s Classics” in a little town in Belgium called Dilsen-Stokkem. He maintained, repaired, customized and restored many luxury Harley-Davidson motorcycles for the past 20 years.

Sandy’s specialty is designing and building exclusive Harley-Davidson motorcycles for his customers. His partner Erick, on the other hand, is a specialist from the automotive industry. Over the years a remarkable symbiosis among the two developed.

The achievable exclusivity in the motorcycle custom business has potentially reached its limit so both Sandy and Erick believe an expansion in the areas of performance, handling, riding safety and riding experience will be the next dimension in the custom business. With this vision in mind, both have decided to unite their resources and skills at Q-Tec engineering which represents the absolute high end of bike innovation and design.

At Q-Tec their revolutionary concept will create a new dimension for many fans of Harley Davidson motorcycles and potentially even transform their Harley into a trike or even into a quad.

 

By implementing both our frontend and backend units, we can transform your Harley-Davidson motorcycle into the most exclusive and ultimate Quad the world has seen.

The concept is only available from Q-Tec engineering and patented globally. Both the Quad and the Trike variations are street legal and certified to the highest European standards and have been awarded European Type Approval. All variations can be driven with a standard car driving license and do not require a specific motorcycle license.

 

Source: qtec-engineering

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Please don’t overlook your feet! The source and solution to your pain…

Aloha, everyone and Happy Holidays!

Let’s talk about feet! Did you know? They are the source and solution to a lot of your chronic pains, sports injuries, and more.

Our feet are our dynamic base. They simultaneously: 1) provide structural support for the entire body; 2) disperse the forces of gravity from above and below (gravity pulls us down and the ground provides equal force, whether we are standing still or moving); and 3) provide us with mobility.

When we have feet that are well-conditioned to be strong, flexible, and mobile, AND stand as centered as we can in gravity upon those feet, then the structures above take on much less wear and tear (especially those knees. Oh, and the hips. Ah yes, and even the low back. Even the neck? Yes, indeed. Well, we had better add in the shoulders and arms).

Can we work ourselves to a better foundation? Yes, we can. As long as we have Breath, yes we can. We all have different sets of circumstances and different levels of what we will achieve – and with that in mind, we can improve our sense of well-being through our feet. So it’s okay if we aren’t all going to be master acrobats or win the Olympic Marathon. It’s okay even if we are missing a foot (I’ve worked with that too). How can I optimize my well being, starting today? Let’s have a good look at the feet and see where I can start improving…

We are quite often using our feet in less-than-ideal ways, which then creates pain and strain in other places. Wearing shoes, for example, often makes us unable to use them to the fullest. As a prime example, those lovely high heels leave us limping by the end of the evening.

But that’s not all. Most any shoe makes us use our toes less. And I’ve seen so many workout videos on social media, such as plyometrics in athletic shoes. The problem with that is, you’re not able to fully use your feet and lower leg muscles, and therefore coordinate with your hip and upper leg muscles, to do that work. The knees take up a lot of impact.

As for runners and other athletes who need to wear shoes for your chosen sport: I recommend that you take a well-worn pair and look closely at the way that you have been wearing the shoes out. Both of them. This will give you loads of information, as to what is happening, and how you can improve.

Should I wear an insert for my shoe, then? Well…. I have a few precautions about that. If you have “flat feet” and add arch supports; or if you get a customized orthotic insert to keep your foot from rolling in/out, this still hasn’t trained your foot and lower leg muscles to support your structure and coordinated movement, so it won’t necessarily make you less prone to injury or pain. And in the case of those of us who present a leg that seems to be “longer” than the other, a lifted hip (i.e. you are presenting with Scoliosis), putting in one shoe lift to make the hips look more “even” actually causes more problems.

It’s not practical to go without shoes much of the time, so there is an approach. It’s foot re-conditioning. And this also is great for those of us whose athletic endeavors are barefoot, or wearing non-slip socks.

As for bare feet: Recently I started a conversation on Facebook after looking at a social media post from a local fitness studio, touting a truly dysfunctional “pointe foot” as a model to emulate in an adult Barre class that’s offered to non-dancers. Ugh! The dancers in that thread agreed that this wasn’t even a functional pointe foot for dance. The squished toes made me cringe. To see this conversation, goto: https://www.facebook.com/lahela.hekekia/posts/10213272328876227.

What can I say about the pointe foot? It’s something that only serious dancers should consider, under supervised guidance by a really good teacher, and following established protocols. Usually this training happens from a very young age and isn’t likely to develop if we are getting into dance as adults (did you know? Many dancers never use the pointe foot. http://www.danceadvantage.net/pointe-readiness/).

Under no circumstance should an adult Barre class for non-dancers be using this pointe foot – yet I have attended a class taught by someone who was telling everyone to go up to the very tips of the toes. And we were doing a photoshoot for part of the class, so she wanted us up up up on the tips of the toes. I steadfastly refused to do it, knowing that my many-times-sprained right ankle would have a fit over it; that ankle would tell my knee and hip to take on some strain, or tell my body to shift everything to the left – and it would all come crashing down. Thanks, I’ll go onto the ball of my foot where you can actually find stability. Even then, I’ve got a lot of reservations about Barre classes in general, but that’s another story.

As for Pilates: I cringe when I see any Pilates teacher placing one lift under a person’s foot or shortening one strap/rope when using the Reformer… it’s dysfunctional. Period. And there are much better ways of approaching uneven legs/hips. Foot conditioning is part of the process.

Foot re-conditioning is fairly simple. This is something I do with clients, and I’m looking at ways of bringing this to a wider audience. You don’t have to have expensive Pilates equipment, you can use some very inexpensive things that are portable. And foot conditioning will assist you in your chosen sport, especially if it requires running or jumping. Or even just balancing on one leg. Please do comment to my website if you’d like to know more! https://holistictherapiesdirectory.com/united-states/kailua/yoga/lahela-hekekia

Blood Count Healing Testimonial

Blood Count Healing Testimonial    My name is Gareth, My wife Shirley and daughter Emma, contacted Joanne Brocas for a distance spiritual healing treatment on behalf of myself. I was taken into hospital by ambulance because of severe stomach pain. On investigation from blood tests and scans, it revealed that I had pancreatitis and stones […]